Friday Favorites: September 6th, 2013

Welcome to Friday Favorites, where we highlight interesting things we’ve seen over the last week.  Although most highlights are grief related, you’ll have to forgive our digressions because we distract easily.  This morning we here in Baltimore are grieving the bum-kicking handed to our Baltimore Ravens by the Denver Broncos in the NFL season opener last night.  Womp womp…here are the articles.

1.  Invisible Casualties by the Huffington Post

Invisible Casualties is a month-long series by the Huffington Post examining facets of the complex issues related to suicide in the military.  A lot happens within this comprehensive collection of articles, including interviews with vets who survived suicide attempts, families remembering their loved ones and telling their stories, discussions on  warning signs, mental illness, stigma, and PTSD, and specific needs related to the grief of a suicide loss.  We want to commend the Huffington Post for giving this issue some of the attention and focus it not only deserves but needs.

2.  Facing the Death of Baby

A few weeks back our hometown newspaper, The Baltimore Sun, ran a story about two local mothers carrying babies diagnosed in utero with conditions they would likely die from at or shortly after birth.  Such diagnoses are often unexpected and send parents reeling as their excited anticipation is replaced with confusion, uncertainty, and grief.  With the help of a local hospice the families were able to find some semblance of comfort and control in an uncontrollable situation,  We’d like to thank both of these mothers for sharing their stories.

3. 10 Orphan Row Houses So Lonely You’ll Want to Take Them Home With You

Speaking of Baltimore, here are photos of abandoned row houses.  What do these photos have to do with grief?  Zero…I just like their symmetry.

4.  The Bereavement Counselor: Public Misperception

The thought that working in the field of death, dying, and bereavement makes you Lydia Deetz with a name badge and a masters degree is one Litsa and I encounter on a regular basis.  lydia deetzAt my real job I hear, “I SURE would hate to have your job” and from my family and friends I hear “I think all this talking about death is making you dark!”.  So I can definitely relate to Rea Ginsberg’s discussion of society’s discomfort with emotional pain and how those who seem to bathe in it (I guess people like me) at best mystify others and at worse make them uncomfortable.  But just the same, Bereavement Counselors, Funeral Directors, Medical Examiners, Social Workers and others working in death and dying will always be there for those who need them.

5.  Website allows grief-stricken to tell stories about the dearly departed

Sarah D’Angelo started the website griefbynotes.com after journaling about her own grief following her father’s death.  Grief By Notes is a site where visitors can anonymously post stories of up to 150 words about their deceased loved ones.  Visitors to the site find comfort in both writing about their loved one and in reading the stories of others.  Here’s to turning grief into good!

6. Listen to The Beatles’ isolated vocal tracks for Abbey Road medley 

Here’s a 16 minute track of the Beatles’ Abbey Road with just vocals.  What does this have to do with grief?  Zero…I just like their harmony.

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April 12, 2017

3 responses on "Friday Favorites: September 6th, 2013"

  1. Thanks for catching my Bereavement Counselor article at pallimed.org. You said it nicely: the public may not understand, but we’ll still be there for those who need us! That’s right!

  2. Thank you for the Beatles music… Favorite band of all time!

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